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  1. #1
    Scrapper Victoria's Avatar
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    I couldn't find the original note that talked about scrapbooking as a source of income, but I believe the consensus was that it would be difficult to make the venture profitable once one considered the expense of paper, embellishments, etc.

    I'm disabled by Fibromyalgia and only able to work part-time. My disability income is $6,000 less per year than I was making TWENTY years ago so always on the lookout for something I can do for pay that allows me to work mostly on my own schedule and wouldn't require a large amount of startup cash.

    Given that digital scrapbooking wouldn't be as expensive if one's product was offered to the client only on CDs, this field would seem more lucrative. Is anyone doing this or do you know someone who is and, if so, what kind of pricing structure seems appropriate? Producing hard copies would likely require a wide format printer (on sale at CompUSA this week for $100 off, but still over $400) and it seems that even printing a single sheet would be pricy so staying strictly digital would seem like the way to go. Of course, one could work in 8 x 11 format which would allow one to use a standard printer.

    Victoria, Seeking to S-T-R-E-T-C-H Her Budget with a Little More Income

  2. #2
    Scrapper Victoria's Avatar
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    I couldn't find the original note that talked about scrapbooking as a source of income, but I believe the consensus was that it would be difficult to make the venture profitable once one considered the expense of paper, embellishments, etc.

    I'm disabled by Fibromyalgia and only able to work part-time. My disability income is $6,000 less per year than I was making TWENTY years ago so always on the lookout for something I can do for pay that allows me to work mostly on my own schedule and wouldn't require a large amount of startup cash.

    Given that digital scrapbooking wouldn't be as expensive if one's product was offered to the client only on CDs, this field would seem more lucrative. Is anyone doing this or do you know someone who is and, if so, what kind of pricing structure seems appropriate? Producing hard copies would likely require a wide format printer (on sale at CompUSA this week for $100 off, but still over $400) and it seems that even printing a single sheet would be pricy so staying strictly digital would seem like the way to go. Of course, one could work in 8 x 11 format which would allow one to use a standard printer.

    Victoria, Seeking to S-T-R-E-T-C-H Her Budget with a Little More Income

  3. #3
    Senior Scrapper
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    I don't know anyone doing digital for profit, so can't offer pricing info. My feeling though, is that most clients would want a printout and not CD only. There are other, presentation style, programs for someone that only want to view on the computer, and are multimedia.

    But you might consider printing out your work. A couple of possiblilities that don't involve your having to purchase a wide format printer...
    Some people print their 12x12 as 8x8 to insert into books.
    Others print full-size 12x12's. There are several companies that offer this and SOMEWHERE I have a list of links.
    Other people have their 12x12 printer on poster size and trim the excess. Again, there are several places for this, but I've heard over and over that Costco is a very good place to go.
    Another possibility would be to print the 8-1/2 by 11 you mentioned, and then attaching it to a coordinating piece of 12x12 cardstock, but as you said, the cost of printing owuld be very high.

    Good Luck with your decision

  4. #4
    Scrapper Stamp Queen's Avatar
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    I considered doing that too until I realized that I would have to pay out a ton of money on commercial licensing on all the artwork! Every kit you buy is for "personal use only" and if you plan on selling the books made with any of the kits you bought, you'd be paying for the license from each and every designer! Not worth it to me! If you can find a way around it let me know!
    As for me and my house, we will serve the Lord. Joshua 24:15

  5. #5
    Senior Scrapper luvscraping's Avatar
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    I have been trying my hand at designing for just a month now, and I have looked at a lot of sites that deal with digital scrapbooking and I have only seen a couple of sites so far that you need to have to buy their commercial licenses to sale on their sites, and there are kits and overlays that are for commercial use as well as personal use, it might cost a dollar or 2 more. I have even pm/emailed them about useing their product in kits even after reading their TOU to make sure I wasn't doing anything wrong. Now you got me worried going to go to the sites I use the most and pm the designers and ask them about it some more.

  6. #6
    Scrapper Victoria's Avatar
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    I'm just learning PhotoShop Elements and I noticed that the CD accompanying the Renee Pearson Digital Designs book said that commercial use was prohibited, but I did think that if you paid for a kit, you would buy the rights with the kit. Guess I would have to double check on that before any purchases.

    Tammy, let us know what you find out from the vendors, please!

    How did you decide how to price your work? I assume that not everyone would have digital photos so do you charge extra to scan the photos? I would be nervous about working with original photos in terms of liability. Did you secure insurance or do you have the clients sign a release of some kind?

    I hope it's all right to ask you questions. I'm north of Dallas and assume we wouldn't be competitors so you could share without feeling it would jeopardize your own business. Thanks for any guidance you can provide. With hundreds of dollars of bills related to total hip replacement surgery, a $3,000 repair to my 11-year old mini-van, a $1,000 vet bill and a $400 electric bill in January, I'm really needing to seek some other income since there is a limit to what I can do in terms of further trimming expenses.

    Best Wishes,
    Victoria

  7. #7
    Senior Scrapper ScrappySam's Avatar
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    Victoria, as far as I know, when you buy anything digit (and some traditional scrap supplies, clipart, etc.) (unless stated royalty free useage allowed) you're buying the right to use product (with limitations - that's the fine print - LOL) but the artist retains the design/copywrite of that product. Another example is if you use a professional photographer's picture (like the ones taken at school or a studio, etc.) you can not copy it nor scrapbook the photo and post it without the photographer's written permission (they retain the rights to the picture). Of course, we scrap these photos and share the LO's on line -- but legally it's not allowed.

    BUT if you use or buy royalty free products you're OK. Again, even some royalty free products have commercial limitations, too.

    Good luck in your venture! sam

  8. #8
    Scrapper Victoria's Avatar
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    Thanks, Sam. Yes, it's those pesky limitations I would need to know about. For example, I bought the educational version of the Macromedia Studio MX a couple of years ago. I can use the product to create my own personal web sites, but am prohibited from using it for commercial use unless I buy the full-priced version. Sooooo, I was thinking that if one bought the "full-priced" version of the digital papers/kits, one would be allowed to use them for producing digital scrapbook pages for others. In contrast, the educational version of Elements 5.0 contains no such restrictions. Good thing, because I consequently saw it on sale for less than I paid for the educational version.

    The scrapbooking magazines feature layouts that include copyrighted material all the time and they make money off the sale of the magazine, but I guess the paper designers wouldn't object to that because the appearance might generate interest in the sale of their product. I could understand that the designers would object to someone reselling their designs as their own, but I'm just talking about, for example, using their papers or embellishments on a digital scrapbook page created for a client's benefit. Guess one would have to explore that with the individual vendors/designers on a case-by-case basis.

    But, hey, I have a long ways to go before I'll be skilled enough to hang out my shingle as a digital scrapbook designer anyway. Just brainstorming ways to cope with sky high utility bills and $3 per gallon petrol while trying to live on less than 45% of my former salary.

    Take care,
    Victoria

  9. #9
    Senior Scrapper ScrappySam's Avatar
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    Victoria I think you're on the right track - and as with any business, you gotta start somewhere. AND think about the product you are creating - after your initial sale, you wouldn't want a 2nd party taking your work and selling it as theirs either. So you would probably copywrite it, too.

    The magazine contracts with scrapers for using their layouts is a little bit different. They are not selling the layout just the image for publication, all supplies must be listed and credit given to the products used & you must sign a statement that the finished layout is originally yours.

    Digital supplies are different than bought supplies - because the design factor is so high, more indiviualized and still a pretty new industry. They aren't manufactoring a gazillion brads - just one.

    I think your idea is great and with a bit of research you could come up with a product that is saleable. These are just my 2 cents worth of FYI's I've encountered. Hope it helps and I wish you the very best in your new business. Just another thought to pass on - check out the pub calls for digital work examples (there's a lot of them) and get some of your work published or enter their contests - you get paid (granted it's not a lot) and they want you to use their products.

  10. #10
    Senior Scrapper Cass17's Avatar
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    Good topic. I never even thought about all that legal stuff.
    I was going to suggest maybe doing a hybrid of digital and paper scrapbooking. Maybe you can save some time by doing some of it digitally where you won't need to print a full 12x12 sheet out. I don't know - just thinking out load (or really on the keyboard!)

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